Posts Tagged 'Parker Palmer'

Together we can achieve what none of us can accomplish alone

Without a community, it is nearly impossible to achieve voice: it takes a village to raise a Rosa Parks. Without a community, it is nearly impossible to exercise the “power of one” in a manner that multiplies: it took a village to translate Park’s act of personal integrity into social change. In a mass society like ours, community rarely comes ready-made. But creating community in the places where we live and work does not mean abandoning other parts of our lives to become full-time organizers. The steady companionship of two or three kindred spirits can kindle the courage we need to speak and act as citizens. —Parker Palmer

Resilient people understand that sustaining a commitment to significant change requires the support, guidance, and inspiration of a community.

But not all groups are created equal in their resilience and effectiveness.

Groups that make a difference:

• have skillful, committed leaders who maintain focus and momentum over time,

• ensure that group time is used productively to achieve the group’s goals,

• have a stable core membership,

• engage in high-impact activities,

• follow through on plans with accountability for results, and

• train group members to successfully complete agreed upon activities.

In schools such collective work requires strong teamwork which can take a variety of forms.

In the area of social justice and political change the group RESULTS sets the standard for grass roots advocacy. Its purpose is to end poverty by “improving access to education, health, and economic opportunity” through advocacy and education of policy makers.

More recently “Indivisible” groups are forming and beginning to take action in many communities throughout the United States. Their purpose is to create local pressure on members of Congress to counter the most destructive policies and actions of the new administration, and even at this early date it appears that they are beginning to have some success.

Indivisible’s advocacy is based “…on a simple idea: Donald Trump’s agenda doesn’t depend on Donald Trump. It depends on your elected members of Congress and whether they go along with him—or whether they fight back.”

If any or all of these approaches are appealing, I encourage you to get involved.

Remember:

• that demagogues win when citizens feel overwhelmed and become resigned to the status quo, and

• that together we can achieve what none of us can accomplish alone.

Practice the habit of self-reflection

Dennis Sparks

[A]s leaders, we all have an obligation to engage in self-reflection lest we lead unconsciously or mindlessly. . . . Socrates said that the unexamined life is not worth living. Now that I am old enough to amend Socrates instead of merely quoting him, I want to add one thing, for the record: if you decide to live an unexamined life, please do not take a job that involves other people. —Parker Palmer

School leaders do not have the luxury of living unexamined lives, as Parker Palmer points out.

The creation of schools in which both young people and adults thrive requires that leaders frequently reflect on their most important purposes and the methods they use to reach those goals.

Leaders and the schools they lead benefit when leaders examine, preferably in writing, the alignment of their broader purposes and values with the daily activities of both their personal and professional lives.

Leaders who think deeply about what they are doing, why they are doing it, and the effects their actions have on others not only improve their effectiveness but model for the school community the value of such reflection.

Because of the cyclical nature of schooling, each new school year offers the possibility of a new beginning. That means that the summer months provide an extended opportunity for many educators to engage in deep reflection on their values, goals, and methods.

Take a moment today to reflect on the congruence between your values and actions. Consider making it a daily habit, if it is not one already, and use whatever opportunities the summer provides for extended reflection.

Why it’s important to value “inward participation” in learning

Dennis Sparks

I tell my students that much as I value dialogue, I affirm their right not to participate overtly in the conversation – as long as I have the sense, and occasional verbal reassurance, that they are participating inwardly. This permission not to speak seems to evoke speech from people who are normally silent… – Parker Palmer

It makes sense that teachers of students of all ages value the outward, verbal participation of learners in class discussions.

Unfortunately, inward participation, which often occurs in the “spaces” during which learners are encouraged to slow down and to think more deeply about the subject at hand, is often less valued.

Fast-moving conversations often leave some participants (particularly introverts) far behind as they continue to ponder points that were made several minutes before.

Inward participation in learning is the difference between “raw opinion,” which is often evoked in “instant polls,” and “considered judgment,” when individuals are given an opportunity for extended deliberation regarding the meaning and implications of various courses of action.

Unfortunately, opportunities for considered judgment are rare in many classrooms and professional development activities. (I write more here about using “white spaces” to improve learning and relationships.)

Everyone benefits when participants in professional conversations or learning activities are provided with opportunities to formulate a point of view on the subject at hand, particularly if it is something to which they previously had not given much thought.

When leaders validate and provide generous amounts of time for inward participation, the more deliberative, thoughtful, and sometimes reticent individuals in a group are more likely to share their unique and often significant contributions.

When it is important for individuals and groups to explore a topic in depth—which is often the case in significant matters of teaching, learning, and leadership—everyone benefits from “think time” which enables the inward participation in learning that Parker Palmer recommends.

What types of participation in learning are most helpful to you as a learner, and how do you encourage, support, and demonstrate to your students—of whatever age—a respect for their inward participation in learning?

Effective leaders nurture the soul

Dennis SparksGrowing our souls could be defined as the steady accretion of empathy, clarity, and passion for the good. —Mary Pipher

Schools possess “souls,” an awareness that struck me when I heard someone describe a school she obviously admired as “a place with soul.”

Schools full of soul:

• are places that members of the school community experience as authentic, profound, personally meaningful, and emotionally stirring, 

• have a uniqueness and integrity based on the principles and moral imperatives that guide their efforts, and

• possess aspirations, commitments, and a “passion for the good” that are both informed by and expressed in their symbols, rituals, ceremonies, and spirit.

Soulful schools exist because leaders welcome, honor, and nourish the souls of all members of the school community.

In A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward An Undivided Life, Parker Palmer describes such leaders as individuals who make “a commitment to act in every situation in ways that honor the soul.”

Consequently, leaders cultivate soul when they:

First and foremost nourish their own souls through practices such as journal writing and solitude. They then engage with the community to hone and test their commitments. Such leaders are more likely to display the generosity of spirit, empathy, and profound respect for others that calls forth the soul of the organization.

Promote teamwork focused on clear and compelling purposes and principles that enable individuals to link their own heartfelt intentions to the common good. Leaders keep these purposes and principles foremost in community members’ minds so that they inform every decision and action.

Cultivate and value the whole person, not just his or her intellect or technical skills. To that end leaders use faculty and team meetings and other venues to provide opportunities for individuals to reveal the events that have shaped their lives, underscoring that community members are not replaceable parts of an “education machine.”

Value the unique perspective and wisdom that that each person brings to the school community and encourage the expression of those qualities. Leaders do so when they promote relationships that are honest, trusting, compassionate, and cooperative. Such relationships provide the emotional safety in which individuals can express the most soulful aspects of themselves, qualities that are the most precious and closely guarded against judgment and criticism.

Use stillness and silence when appropriate to create opportunities for individuals to listen to their “inner teachers” and discern their own truths.

Leaders  who nurture their own souls and the collective soul of the school community have a profound affect on the community and all those whose lives are touched and shaped by it.

Why it’s important to “go slow at the beginning”

Dennis Sparks

“Anything worth doing is worth doing slowly,” Mae West said.

In addition to whatever reasons West may have had in mind, “going slow” is essential when the goal in significant professional learning or making important decisions.

In Leading for Results I recounted a story told by author Parker Palmer about a veteran heart surgeon teaching neophyte surgeons a challenging procedure in which they have only 60 seconds to complete a procedure during which a patient’s life hangs in the balance. The surgeon’s advice: “Go slow at the beginning.”

Recognizing the value of that advice in other contexts, I wrote, “So, too, it is important to slow down, to gain clarity and direction when our culture and the adrenaline flowing through our bodies tells us that success requires moving ever faster.”

These thoughts were brought to mind when reader Joanne Mattiucci commented on a recent post on the value of professional conversations:

“I have just participated in a Common Core workshop series that was done deeply and well. Your mantra of ‘go slow in the beginning’ was done to perfection through the use of a number of protocols. A protocol that was used through out the session was “Notice and Wonder.” Whenever the facilitator gave us something new to look at, instead of telling us about it, she asked us to read it closely and talk about what we noticed and wondered about it. The outcome was that meaning was made, and ownership for what we were working on was gained. The facilitator did a really solid job of modeling this practice, and again, I thought of Leading for Results: What we want for our students, is what we want for our teachers, is what we want for our leaders.”

I encourage you to “go slow”:

• at the beginning of meetings to enable participants to become fully present with one another and engaged with the meeting’s purposes,

• during conversations of substance so that all participants are fully heard and understood,

• at the start of what you anticipate may be an important learning experience to access prior knowledge and experiences, and

• apropos of Mae West, when experiencing anything that you would like to savor.

When else might it be valuable to “go slow?”

 

Leadership 180: Speak With An Authentic Voice

Dennis Sparks

We grant authority to people we perceive as “authoring” their own words and actions, people who do not speak from a script or behave in preprogrammed ways. 

—Parker Palmer

Leaders’ authentic voice is one of their most important leadership “tools.” Simply put, a leader’s voice is a clear and genuine expression of his or her intentions, ideas, beliefs, values, and emotions, a voice brought into every meeting, professional learning setting, and one-to-one interaction with teachers, parents, and students. Leaders have an authentic voice when they speak from their own heart and values rather than sounding as if they are reading from or acting out a script provided by others.

Today I will reflect on the extent to which what I really think and value on the inside is expressed to the outside world through my words and actions. I will identify ways to reduce any discrepancies I may find.

[This “meditation” is one of 180 (one for every day of the traditional school year) provided in Leadership 180: Daily Meditations on School Leadership. It is my most recent and I think best book, available as a Kindle book for $14.39, which is just 8 cents per day as a source of professional learning and encouragement in developing valuable new habits.]

 


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